University Hospital Research Centre, Montreal
Where Thermix® is already
right at home

Thermix® spacers “inside” 

It’s not always easy to recognise projects constructed using Thermix® spacers, so here is a small selection of references:


Residence of German Embassy in Santiago de Chile
Residence of German Embassy in Santiago de Chile, Chile
University Hospital Research Centre, Montreal
Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, Canada
Ryerson University Student Learning Centre, Toronto, Canada
Ryerson University Student Learning Centre, Toronto, Canada
Expo City 2017: Astana
Expo City 2017, Astana, Kazakhstan
Flora, Cologne
Flora, Cologne, Germany
University Hospital Research Centre, Montreal
University Hospital Research Centre, Montreal, Canada
ENERGON, Ulm
ENERGON, Ulm, Germany
Ensinger Sintimid, Austria
Ensinger Sintimid, Seewalchen, Austria
Treskow Hoefe, Berlin
Treskow Hoefe, Berlin, Germany
Mölk-Pressegrosso in Osnabrück
Mölk-Pressegrosso, Osnabrück, Germany
Student halls of residence in Wuppertal
Student halls of residence, Wuppertal, Germany
Cinema complex in Ravensburg
Cinema complex, Ravensburg, Germany
Allgäu Energy and Environmental Centre Building
Allgäu Energy and Environmental Centre Building (eza!-haus), Allgäu, Germany
Leipzig Opera House
Opera House, Leipzig, Germany

Residence of German Embassy in Santiago de Chile, Chile

As part of a complete refurbishment of the German Embassy residence in Santiago de Chile, all the windows were replaced. Wooden windows and doors from the company LIP GmbH were used. The glass manufacturer NOWAK GLAS supplied the insulated glazed units with integrated Thermix® TX.N plus spacers and Thermix® muntin bars.

Picture: © BBR/Christian Hagemann, Berlin

Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, Canada

Energy-efficient insulating glass from Prelco, equipped with a Thermix® warm edge, provides light and a healthy indoor environment in the “Pavillon K” building complex at the Jewish General Hospital in Montreal.

Picture: ©Stephane Groleau

Ryerson University Student Learning Centre, Toronto, Canada

The LEED*-compliant design of the new Student Learning Centre at the Ryerson University in Toronto was achieved using triple glazing from the company Prelco from Quebec. The warm edge is provided by Thermix® spacers.

*(Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design)

Picture source: Prelco Inc.

Expo City 2017, Astana, Kazakhstan

The theme of the Expo 2017 in Astana, Kazakhstan is "Energy of the future: measures for global sustainability". The entire Expo site has also been designed with this in mind. There is therefore a particular focus on the energy efficiency of the Expo City building. Thermix® makes its contribution as Warm Edge spacer in the insulating glass produced by KSS Astana.

Architect: Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill

Insulating glass manufacturer: KSS Astana, Kazakhstan

Thermix® retailer: GlassPro, Lithuania

Flora, Cologne, Germany

Steeped in tradition, the magnificent building which forms the centre piece of Cologne's Botanical Gardens opened again in 2014 after a three-year renovation. Perfectly timed for the 150th Jubilee. The insulated glazed units for the segmental arched windows with glazing bars were supplied by Nowak Glas. Providing the warm edge were Thermix® spacers and Thermix® muntin bars.

Picture: Jens Willebrand Photographie

University Hospital Research Centre, Montreal, Canada

A perfect combination for energy-saving glazing: insulating glass from Prelco and Thermix® spacers in the new University Hospital Research Centre in Montreal.

Picture: ©Stephane Groleau

ENERGON, Ulm, Germany

The ENERGON, now used by NOKIA as a development location, is the world’s biggest office building constructed to the Passivhaus Standard. The windows and facades feature Thermix® spacers.

Architect: oehler + arch kom

Ensinger Sintimid, Seewalchen, Austria

Ensinger’s new Austrian head office could be described as ‘having the edge’: the glass façade in the foyer leads visitors invitingly into the building with a quarter turn. So they could be used with the semicircular insulating glass elements made by Wenna Glas it was essential to bend “rigid” Thermix® spacers into shape to produce a precise radius.

Treskow Hoefe, Berlin, Germany

The goal of this municipal building project in Berlin was to create affordable housing which also complied with the principles of green living. Low utility costs go a long way towards achieving these dual aims. In the insulating glass units, Thermix® is used to ensure ideal thermal insulation.

Mölk-Pressegrosso, Osnabrück, Germany

Energy efficiency applied in modern industrial construction:

Thermix® spacers in plastic were used for the insulated glazed units in the Mölk-Pressegrosso building in Osnabrück.

Student halls of residence, Wuppertal, Germany

The Burse hall of residence for students in Wuppertal is the biggest residential property brought into line with the Passivhaus Standard by a comprehensive renovation program anywhere in Germany.

Architecture: Contor Müller Schlüter

Cinema complex, Ravensburg, Germany

Thermix® links economy with attractive design. Modern steel facade in the “Die Burg” cinema complex in Ravensburg.

Allgäu Energy and Environmental Centre Building (eza!-haus), Allgäu, Germany

eza!-haus: The building which houses the Allgäu Energy and Environmental Centre is a renovated and energy-optimized historic building. Today, the eza!-haus consumes only ten per cent of its former heating energy requirement. A wide range of modern construction and energy saving features have been implemented in the eza!-Haus, including Thermix® spacers. Today, the building is used as a centre for energy advice, exhibitions and training.

Opera House, Leipzig, Germany

The recent refurbishment of windows in the Leipzig Opera House was carried out using golden Thermix® spacers and muntin bars. A gold anodized aluminium fascia on the panel creates the perfect optical impression. By replacing the windows in keeping with heritage building regulations and in compliance with the Energy Saving Ordinance (EnEV) with a Uw value of 1.3 W/m²K, the aim was to reduce the energy required for heating the building by 15 to 20 percent, and so ensure the future viability of the Opera House.